Overall Musical Climate in Asia
#1
Aside from Japan, South Korea, and China, Asia doesn't really get that much exposure in the West. There's more political control that's been inhibiting a lot of talent in countries such as India, Malaysia, Singapore, and so on. There are some bands, however, that are trying to break out of the harsh industry in their respective regions.

One of my favorite recent bands from Malaysia is Nuclear Strikes. They're a traditional heavy metal band that released just a 2011 EP, but it's filled with some great jams. I think retro metal in Asia has fared better than in the West, as evidenced by the more intricate riffing style. As Loudness is such a huge name in Asia, it's not a surprise that many musicians in those parts of the world are quite talented.



I don't really know too much about exactly how the labels work in the more obscure parts of Asia, so anyone willing to chime in would be excellent. I think that Sambora would know.
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#2
I like the music on this one. The vocal is kind of buried, but she sounds pretty good otherwise.
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#3
There's been a time about a decade and a half ago that people in an Asian country - I think it was Malaysia, but I'm not certain enough to make it a statement - were arrested simply for having long hair on suspicion of devil worship. Given that situation, I can see why you would want to put your metal band on hold for a while.

As for distribution here, I was always kind of bummed that the only non-English music that is relatively easy to obtain in the west is on world music labels like Putumayo. That's no criticism to them, they've released some amazing stuff, but for proper rock or pop music from the far or even the near east, the options are limited.

I understand why labels would be wary of investing into a band with limited touring options in the west - for one because travel is expensive - but for all the money they've been pumping into so many bad retro bands, they could have invested in a handful of good Asian ones, don't you think?
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#4
I didn't know about the Malaysian law, if actually true, but I wouldn't be surprised. It must have been absolutely horrible to grow up in the 1980s in South Korea as a metalhead, but the likes of Sinawe and Black Syndrome somehow made it out in one piece. I do have to wonder what the laws on music are like in countries such as Vietnam, since the whole war thing happened.

Anyway, I couldn't agree with you more on the labels not willing to sign promising new bands, yet they are totally fine with snapping up a bunch of no-talent retro bands that are only popular for all the wrong reasons.
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#5
I wonder what it's like in Indonesia; they're the biggest muslim country in the world and according to some strict interpretations of the Koran, music is forbidden unless it's spiritual music. That's why a lot of musicians - often themselves muslims - fled northern Mali a couple of years ago.
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#6
That's also another one right there, unfortunately. Even back in the 1980s, most of their bands were full of ballads among known recordings. I guess metal itself has always been demonized in those areas of the world. Brunei is pretty Muslim, too, but I was surprised to find out that there are a few extreme metal bands residing there — that's assuming that they're not faking where they're from. Smile
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#7
Haha yeah I remember one Mongolian band in the Encylcopaedia Metallum that had something like "It is debated whether the band is really from Mongolia" or something like that in their info Smile
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